London Marathon 2016 Tips


London Marathon 2016 Tips

With only a few months to go until this years’ London marathon here are some tips to help you along the way.

  • You should now be varying your running distances with the aim of gradually reducing them about a month before the event in order to prevent overtraining and the depletion of your glycogen reserves.
  • Take every opportunity to be on your feet, especially if you are not a regular runner or have a sedentary job/lifestyle. walk more, use stairs, park further away than usual, get up and walk around when taking phone calls or talking. All this will help you get used to being on your feet for several hours, there is a lot of standing around before you even begin the race!
  • Stretch regularly – calves, quadriceps and hamstrings.
  • If you are getting pain or niggles then get them checked early, it is much easier to deal with problems when they first appear.
  • By now you should be deciding what suits you best to eat and drink around the course and have practised taking on both when running – not always easy to do!
  • If you are running in warmer weather then make sure you are well hydrated but do not take on large amounts of fluid in one go, it is easier and much more effective to keep sipping small amounts frequently.
  • Use the few months before the event to increase your carbohydrate intake – pasta/rice/potatoes/bread/pulses and cereals. These will build up your glycogen levels for slow-release energy; avoid fatty food as it is difficult to digest.
  • Do not save new shoes, clothes or socks to wear on the day, comfort is all. If you have two pairs of shoes and socks alternate wearing them during training. If possible get a friend or family member to have one pair ready around the course to change into if the weather is wet.
  • Use plenty of Vaseline or talc on your feet and anywhere else that has creases or may rub or chafe, ie. groin, bottom, belly button, underarms, inner thighs, nipples or toes. Moisture will give you blisters.
  • Stay close to the middle of the road to avoid the camber if possible.
  • Eat something within half an hour of finishing a longer run and try to have a high carbohydrate meal within three hours if possible to help restore those energy levels. Again, keep sipping those fluids.
  • PACE yourself and practice timing your distances, miles or kilometres, so that you get used to knowing what your pace is and what is a comfortable and realistic time for you. It is easy on the day to get caught up in the free for all at the start of the race and go off too quickly.
  • Don’t train if you feel unwell or have a cold or flu, when symptoms settle gradually get back on track with your training schedule and try not to make up for lost time by pushing yourself too hard.